What is Cloud?

The definition for the cloud can seem murky, but essentially, it’s a term used to describe a global network of servers, each with a unique function. The cloud is not a physical entity, but instead is a vast network of remote servers around the globe which are hooked together and meant to operate as a single ecosystem. These servers are designed to either store and manage data, run applications, or deliver content or a service such as streaming videos, web mail, office productivity software, or social media. Instead of accessing files and data from a local or personal computer, you are accessing them online from any Internet-capable device—the information will be available anywhere you go and anytime you need it.

Businesses use four different methods to deploy cloud resources. There is a public cloud that shares resources and offers services to the public over the Internet, a private cloud that isn’t shared and offers services over a private internal network typically hosted on-premises, a hybrid cloud that shares services between public and private clouds depending on their purpose, and a community cloud that shares resources only between organizations, such as with government institutions.

 

How does cloud computing works?

Cloud computing services come in different types designed to fit different needs to suit different business/individual user’s needs. Some types of cloud computing services are designed exclusively for individual users to store documents, photos, and videos while there are other types of computing services that cater for companies to deliver infrastructure to develop IT applications. Cloud computing services are offered at a price. Fees can be paid on a monthly or yearly basis and price vary depending on the type of services you choose from the provider.

Cloud Computing is built up of two sections – front end and back-end sections while they integrated with each other through the internet.

The user-facing is the front end and it comprises of the client’s application/network or the computer that is connected to the client network the backend is where all the devices, data storage systems, and servers are connected to form a cloud.

What are the different types of cloud computing services?

 Cloud computing types are service deployment models that let you choose the level of control over your information and types of services you need to provide. There are three main types of cloud computing services, sometimes called the cloud computing stack because they build on top of one another.

The first cloud computing type is infrastructure-as-a-service (IaaS), which is used for Internet-based access to storage and computing power. The most basic category of cloud computing types, IaaS lets you rent IT infrastructure – servers and virtual machines, storage, networks, and operating systems – from a cloud provider on a pay-as-you-go basis.

The second cloud computing type is platform-as-a-service (PaaS) that gives developers the tools to build and host web applications. PaaS is designed to give users access to the components they require to quickly develop and operate web or mobile applications over the Internet, without worrying about setting up or managing the underlying infrastructure of servers, storage, networks, and databases.

The third cloud computing type is software-as-a-service (SaaS) which is used for web-based applications. SaaS is a method for delivering software applications over the Internet where cloud providers host and manage the software applications making it easier to have the same application on all of your devices at once by accessing it in the cloud.

Types Of Cloud Computing ?

Hybrid Cloud Computing

A hybrid cloud is a type of cloud computing that combines on-premises infrastructure—or a private cloud—with a public cloud. Hybrid clouds allow data and apps to move between the two environments.

Many organizations choose a hybrid cloud approach due to business imperatives such as meeting regulatory and data sovereignty requirements, taking full advantage of on-premises technology investment, or addressing low latency issues.

The hybrid cloud is evolving to include edge workloads as well. Edge computing brings the computing power of the cloud to IoT devices—closer to where the data resides. By moving workloads to the edge, devices spend less time communicating with the cloud, reducing latency, and they are even able to operate reliably in extended offline periods.

Advantages of the hybrid cloud:

  • Control—your organization can maintain a private infrastructure for sensitive assets or workloads that require low latency.
  • Flexibility—you can take advantage of additional resources in the public cloud when you need them.
  • Cost-effectiveness—with the ability to scale to the public cloud, you pay for extra computing power only when needed.
  • Ease—transitioning to the cloud doesn’t have to be overwhelming because you can migrate gradually—phasing in workloads over time.

Public Cloud

Public clouds are the most common type of cloud computing deployment. The cloud resources (like servers and storage) are owned and operated by a third-party cloud service provider and delivered over the internet. With a public cloud, all hardware, software, and other supporting infrastructure are owned and managed by the cloud provider. Microsoft Azure is an example of a public cloud.

In a public cloud, you share the same hardware, storage, and network devices with other organizations or cloud “tenants,” and you access services and manage your account using a web browser. Public cloud deployments are frequently used to provide web-based email, online office applications, storage, and testing and development environments.

Advantages of public clouds:

  • Lower costs—no need to purchase hardware or software, and you pay only for the service you use.
  • No maintenance—your service provider provides the maintenance.
  • Near-unlimited scalability—on-demand resources are available to meet your business needs.
  • High reliability—a vast network of servers ensures against failure.

Private Cloud

A private cloud consists of cloud computing resources used exclusively by one business or organization. The private cloud can be physically located at your organization’s on-site datacenter, or it can be hosted by a third-party service provider. But in a private cloud, the services and infrastructure are always maintained on a private network and the hardware and software are dedicated solely to your organization.

In this way, a private cloud can make it easier for an organization to customize its resources to meet specific IT requirements. Private clouds are often used by government agencies, financial institutions, any other mid- to large-size organizations with business-critical operations seeking enhanced control over their environment.

Advantages of a private cloud:

  • More flexibility—your organization can customize its cloud environment to meet specific business needs.
  • More control—resources are not shared with others, so higher levels of control and privacy are possible.
  • More scalability—private clouds often offer more scalability compared to on-premises infrastructure.
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